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10 Wildest Cars In Paul Walker's Collection (And 10 Anyone Can Afford)

Paul Walker's rise to superstardom coincided with the 2001 release of the wildly popular street racing film, The Fast and the Furious. In the film, and in its many sequels, Walker plays an undercover FBI agent who becomes far too entangled with his criminal counterparts, led by Vin Diesel's Dominic Toretto. Walker's public popularity was further buoyed by the surfer-romance Blue Crush, but his role in the Fast and Furious films will be the lasting impression fans think of, especially due to the role that road racing played in his untimely death in 2013.

But many fans may not realize that out of the enormous (and still growing) cast of the Fast and Furious movies, Walker was the only true automotive enthusiast. And with the success of installment after installment, he earned enough money to build up one of Hollywood's great car collections - albeit one that followed his specific tastes. From muscle cars to modern day supercars, the fact remains that automobiles played a major role in Walker's life, as well as his loss.

Following the tragedy, the custodians of Walker's collection, Always Evolving Performance, allowed Matt Farah of The Smoking Tire inside their warehouse for a glimpse and a quick film session. The video is worth a watch, as even a car buff like Farah can hardly keep his wits about him. Keep scrolling for 10 cars from the collection that the average driver can afford at any time, and 10 so expensive that most people would give an arm and a leg for a chance to drive even once.

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20 Nissan 370Z

via superstreetonline.com

While Gal Gadot may have schooled the crew in Fast Five thanks to her driving skills, at least part of the credit has to go to the Nissan 370Z she had borrowed.

Paul Walker actually ended up buying the car from the film, and though his has plenty of movie-friendly and performance-minded mods, just about anyone can afford a 370Z in real life.

Debuting in 2009 to replace the equally stellar 350Z, the 370z offers a V6 putting out plenty of power, a well-balanced chassis, and a manual transmission for drivers looking to hone their skills. A brand new 2019 370Z still starts under $30,000, while used examples can be found for down in the low teens.

19 B5 Audi S4

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When the B5-generation of Audi S4 debuted, it was the world's fastest sedan on the market. And though that was two decades ago, the S4 platform still proves popular in many circles thanks to its twin-turbocharged, 2.7-liter V6, which can be mated to a six-speed stick shift and Quattro all-wheel drive. That engine has proven capable of handling plenty more power, as Audi essentially reinforced their normally aspirated 2.8-liter unit before bolting on two turbos, and the car's simple exterior and comfy interior don't hurt, either. Finding a sedan is a snap, as plenty are on the market at any time in various levels of condition - a wagon, on the other hand, might command $14-16,000 if maintained well.

18 Nissan Silvia (240SX)

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Paul Walker owned a couple of Nissan Silvias, which may be more familiar to audiences of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, a movie Walker didn't even show up in.

But in Tokyo Drift, a Silvia is referred to as the "Mona Lisa" of drifting - high praise but possibly disappointing to domestic buyers who lament that the Silvia never made it to these shores.

However, a solid alternative exists in the form of the Nissan 240Sx. Though its powertrain may not be quite as enticing as the JDM version, all the balance and handling come through in a very affordable package.

17 Fox Body Ford Mustang

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Matt Farah skips over so many Fox Body Mustangs in Paul Walker's collection that it's almost hard to count just how many he owned among all the special-edition, modified coupes. But the Fox Body is a great way for Mustang fans to get into the retro Mustang market without having to go quite as far back as the first generation - anyone with any taste avoids the second gen like the plague. Fox Body Mustangs can be found in a wide range of condition, but moderately maintained driver's level examples can easily be found with a nice V8 under the hood at around $10,000.

16 Jeep Wrangler

via conceptcarz.com

The Jeep Wrangler is one of the most quintessential vehicles ever to roll out of a Detroit factory. The simple design has evolved over the years, but is still recognizable at first glance in any generation.

With a capable four-wheel drive system, utilitarian interior and exterior design, and a stout, if not overwhelming, engine under the hood, any Wrangler is a good bet for off-roading (and they're increasingly popular in town, as well).

A new base-spec Wrangler is easily attainable under $30,000 and older, highly modified examples can be found for below $10,000 - though stock Wranglers from the 1980s and 90s are creeping up in value.

15 Ford Bronco

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The Ford Bronco may be most famous for being OJ Simpson's choice of getaway car, but today every generation of the Bronco is steadily increasing in price. Especially with the added press of a potential future Bronco hitting the market, now is the time to get one, though finding an example as clean as Paul Walker's may be fairly difficult. Nonetheless, one of the first true SUVs to hit the market with a purpose, the Bronco offers plenty of utilitarian capability, and just a little more classiness than its contemporaries thanks to an iconic style (and maybe a bit of infamy).

14 Fourth Gen Ford Mustang

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Paul Walker's obsession with the Ford Mustang in all its forms quickly becomes evident in his collection. From highly collectible early Mustangs to the latest Roush upgraded monsters, he apparently felt the need to buy plenty of each generation - including the sub-par fourth-gen of the 1990s.

Today, anyone can afford a fourth-gen Mustang and it's not necessarily a good thing.

However, if a Mustang of some kind is on the shopping list, a 1994 in GT trim might be the best bang for the (low) buck, and can probably be found in good shape for under $10,000, while beater base-spec examples might reside in the sub-$3,000 range.

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13 Nissan Altima

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No one, not Matt Farah or the film crew, or even the Always Evolving guys, seems to know why Paul Walker kept a Nissan Altima in his collection. But regardless, just about anyone can afford to buy an Altima in either new or used condition. Brand-spanking-new Altimas start in the low $20,000 range, and used ones fit into the same category of boring, commuter-oriented Craigslist posts that old Honda Civics and Toyota Corollas occupy. But an Altima might be even cheaper, as Nissan's reputation for reliability isn't quite up to par with the products made by its fellow Japanese manufacturers.

12 Mercedes-Benz 560SL

via cardomain.com

Offering timeless style, plenty of powertrain options (topped by an almost too-powerful V8), and old-school reliability, Mercedes-Benz's R107 lineup may be one of the best buys on the used car market today.

Though finding one with a usable convertible top may be a stretch, plenty of people saved their removable hard-tops, which essentially turn the car into a weatherproof coupe and also help to reduce harsh noisiness during highway driving.

The only negative for the R107 is that the United States didn't receive a stick shift option, but this is really a tourer, anyways. Go for the range-topping 560SL, which can burn rubber off the line thanks to 287 lb-ft of torque, cruise comfortably at 80 miles per hour, and should cost under $10,o00 if well-kept and moderately clean.

11 Fifth Gen Ford Mustang

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After the fourth generation of Ford Mustangs proved so disappointing, Ford couldn't go anywhere but up with the fifth gen. And though the exterior design at least pointed forward to today's amazing Mustangs, the fact is that the fifth gen was only just barely better than its predecessor. Paul Walker owned a couple, with a couple of different (usually Roush-related) upgrades, but on the secondhand market fifth gen Mustangs can be found without any difficulty. Their handling and power will likely seem disappointing compared to just financing a new Mustang, but for the sake of a cash purchase, a fifth gen might just make sense at around $4,000.

10 E36 BMW M3 Lightweight

via motorwerksmarketing.com

Plenty of drivers might make the mistake of seeing an E36 M3 Lightweight on the streets and thinking that some wannabe racer just put some decals and a big wing on his car to make it look cool.

But in reality, BMW made a limited run of Lightweights, which featured a stripped-down interior, special wheels, and that big rear wing, as well as carbon fiber trim pieces, a 3.23 limited slip differential, and aluminum doors.

Today, investors are gobbling them up, with examples selling for more than $100,000. Paul Walker owned seven, each worth around 10 times more than a regular E36 M3.

9 BMW M1

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BMW's M1 was the first M-badged car ever made by the German manufacturer. The M1 set the stage for every future M generation, but none have truly matched up to the fully race-bred design of the original. With a mid-mounted engine, seating for two, and a distinctive wedge profile, the M1 stands out from all of BMW's other M cars, which makes perfect sense given that it was created to satisfy homologation rules rather than BMW's current practice of modifying road-going cars for competition or sticking with prototypes only. The paint scheme on Paul Walker's M1 would only add to its value, which could approach half a million bucks.

8 BMW 850CSi

via taylorpatterson.com

From the outside, not much differentiates the BMW 850CSi from its lower-spec 8-Series siblings. But the 850CSi was the closest BMW ever came to making an M8 (many BMW enthusiasts will always lament that fact). The 8-Series is already an awesome car just from its wedge-shaped exterior alone, but throw in the 850CSi's V12, a six-speed manual transmission, burbling exhaust, and improved suspension, and the car borders on leaving the grand touring class and might just be a true sports car. With a potential M8 debuting next year, and prices for 850CSi examples skyrocketing, a car like Paul Walker's is easily worth over $100,000.

7 Saleen S7

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The Saleen S7 was arguably this country's first true mid-engined supercar, offering power and performance that is still impressive to this day. The S7's exterior leaves no doubt that it was designed for speed and traction, and its mid-mounted V8 cranked out up to 1,000 horsepower when equipped with two turbochargers.

The Saleen S7 also offered luxurious amenities, including a backup camera, remotely controlled doors, and bespoke luggage to go along with its space-age honeycomb chassis structure.

The S7 may not have been Paul Walker's highest value car, but it was almost definitely the fastest, with a top speed of 248 miles per hour.

6 Ford GT

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When Ford released the GT in the early 21st century, it was one of the world's most impressive supercars and came with a history to back up its radical styling and performance. The GT was a modern take on the original GT40, the world-beating car built thanks to a team-up between Ford and Carroll Shelby with the expressed intention of beating Enzo Ferrari and his racing team at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Today's GT is much more futuristic looking, but Paul Walker's still retains that 1960s style - albeit with a supercharged V8 pumping out 550 horsepower and 500 lb-ft of torque. Fans of both the old and the new have to abandon all hope of owning one unless there's a few hundred thousand dollars sitting around, though.

5 Rolls-Royce Ghost

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Everyone knows that not many people can afford a Rolls-Royce - that's half the fun of owning one, after all! But Paul Walker's Rolls was extra special, wearing a two-step matte blue wrap job which alone may have cost around $11,000.

Of course, $11,000 doesn't seem like much compared to the Ghost's original price tag of more than $300,000, but the fact remains that the wrap alone cost more than plenty of the more affordable cars that Walker owned.

But the 5,500 pound Ghost offers both luxury and power in another class, and can even sprint to 60 miles per hour in under five seconds thanks to its massive 562-horsepower, twin-turbocharged V12.

4 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

via forcegt.com

Porsche's 911 entered a new era with the introduction of water-cooled engines to the model. However, the groundbreaking shift brought with it a significant flaw: the IMS bearing that could cause spontaneous engine failure. Luckily, Porsche Turbos utilized a Mezger-designed engine derived from the GT1 race car, which did not have the IMS flaw. When Porsche released the GT3, essentially a rear-wheel-drive car with the Mezger engine, it seemed like the best of both worlds for track-obsessed Porsche fans. Paul Walker's GT3 RS is a direct successor and an improved version of those track cars, and he even owned three. But he's not the only Porsche fan looking for GT3s, and values have skyrocketed in recent years.

3 Ferrari 360 Challenge Stradale

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Paul Walker's character in the Fast and Furious franchise enjoys street racing just as much as Walker himself enjoyed track time in real life. His Ferrari 360 Challenge Stradale is further evidence of the money Walker put into his track cars, as the special-edition version of the 360 Modena includes plenty of track-specific upgrades.

Horsepower is bumped up by 20, while weight trimmings and improved suspension are the main focus.

Ceramic brakes, plexiglass windows, carbon fiber trim, a tighter steering ratio, and even Resin Transfer Molding on the bumpers and side skirts all helped shave pounds, but at a cost: values could easily exceed $300,000.

2 Yenko Super Camaro

via jcwhitney.com

In 2 Fast 2 Furious, Walker's character engages in a road race, pitting nimble JDM sportsters against a couple of beastly muscle cars. But the race may not have been as unfair as it seemed, given that one was a Yenko Super Camaro, one of the rarest and most sought-after muscle cars ever made. The Super Camaro came about because former race driver and dealership owner Don Yenko wanted a Camaro with a Corvette engine, so he bought 106 Camaro SS editions and modified them himself. The resulting car is so desirable that today values have skyrocketed, with a record being set by an auction that closed at $600,000.

1 Porsche Carrera GT

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Paul Walker and the Porsche Carrera GT will always be linked in the minds of fans due to the fact that he tragically lost his life after a friend lost control of his Carrera GT (due to aged tires) and crashed the car, resulting in a fire.

But Walker himself also owned a Carrera GT, in identical red. And the Carrera GT was arguably the world's most advanced car when it debuted in 2003, and only 1,270 ever left the factory.

With a pure carbon fiber monocoque and subframe, active aero components, and a mid0mounted 5.7-liter V10, the Carrera GT was no slouch, and today prices have only increased from the $440,000 original sticker.

Sources: bmwblog.com, wikipedia.org, and imdb.org.

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