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10 Great Cars which deserve to be back in the market

Ever car has its life-cycle come to an end at some point. But these really should make a comeback.

With time comes progress; this is a saying that rings true for nearly all things in life. Cars are no exception to this. Ever since the first gas-powered car was invented back in 1885, people around the world have been trying to make it better. Companies have risen and fallen, all leaving their mark on this invention. Many designs are influenced by the time in which they were created, such as during the Space Race or free love. For one reason or another, these cars fall out of style, are discontinued, and quietly disappear from the market. However, not all of the cars that met this fate should necessarily be forgotten. So here are ten cars that deserve a revival.

10 Ford Thunderbird

The Ford Thunderbird was first released in 1955 as a sports car to compete with their rivals in the business, Chevrolet. It actually can boast the proud title as America’s first sports car that was made on our own soil. The classic two-seater has had many iterations and was produced for a stunning 50 years. The last Thunderbird rolled off the production line on July 1st, 2005. Throughout its life-span, this car had a sleek look and with such a long, beloved legacy, as well as the prestigious title of first American-made sports car, it deserves to be put back into production for the current generation of drivers to enjoy.

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9 Acura TL

Manufactured in 1995 and produced up until 2014, the Acura TL was meant to be a buyer’s first step up the ladder of finer things. It wasn’t as expensive as the company’s “true” luxury cars, but it had the look of them. Indeed, with its fine features and sports car look, this car gave you a taste of how the other half lived. In addition, the car was, by all accounts, a good, dependable, quality vehicle. This one needs to make a comeback so the average person can treat themselves to something a little nicer but still feel good about owning a sensible vehicle.

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8 Cord 810/812

Cord Automobile was a company in the often romanticized Gangster Era. Organized crime was at the height of its power, influence, and wealth. Enter the Cord 810 in the year 1936. While it wasn’t made for the more unscrupulous members of society, the flashy look definitely drew the eye of head mobsters. However, gangsters buying the cars wasn’t enough to keep the company afloat. So, after failing to resell leftover Cord 810s as Cord 812s in 1937, Cord Automobile was shuttered by its parent company. Still, the car has cemented its place in history as being synonymous with the era and a re-release priced lower for the more average ‘gangster’ would be a great window into history.

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7 Cadillac Coupe DeVille

Cadillac has built a reputation for being a luxury car company. You know you’ve made it in life once you can afford a ‘Caddy’ as they’re affectionately called. There was one model of Cadillac produced for the first time in 1958, that not only continued this tradition but did so in a big way; literally. Being in a classification known as land-yachts, the DeVille was known for being large, but more specifically, for being long. The longest version of the Deville was made in 1974 and was a whopping 230.7 inches or nearly 20-feet long! The model’s production was ended in 2005 but a classy ride like this deserves to cruise the streets once again.

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6 Chrysler Town & Country

This car, or more specifically, the minivan was nothing particularly fancy and wasn’t even that great to look at. However, it was essential and a bit iconic in its own way. It's the quintessential ‘soccer mom’ family vehicle. It began its life in 1989 as a big spacious vehicle with plenty of room for the kids, the family dog, all your luggage for a cross-country road trip. In fact, you’ve probably been seeing this car in family movies all your life. This simple, yet safe and dependable car got the kids and their friends to practice for 27 years before finally being discontinued in 2016. This car deserves to return and remind us all of a simpler time of family car rides.

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5 Packard Eight

The Packard Eight was produced for a short time, from 1930 to 1938. It was produced in small quantities at the time and was branded as a luxury car for a price of $2,885, which would cost you $44,241.04 in today’s money. It certainly wasn’t the most expensive car on the market but when other cars were going for around $500, ( or $7,667.43 in present time) it was a hard sell to make when everyone was barely recovering from the Great Depression. Still, it’s stylish but not overly gaudy and a breath of fresh air when compared to the parade of very similar looking vehicles cruising the streets today.

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4 VW Type 2

This vehicle is actually another van and was influenced by the era of its creation and has subsequently captured it for the rest of time. You may know this car better by its nicknames such as ‘Hippie Vans’ or ‘Hippie Buses.’ Further still, if you have a young child, they might recognize this vehicle from the animated film Cars. The movie features living cars and one character named Fillmore is a VW Type 2 and has a stereotypical ‘hippie’ persona. The VW Type 2 was first released in 1950 but really took off in popularity in the 1960s. The large capacity allowed plenty of people to pile in and hit the road together. It’s run ended in 2013 and its happy presence would be great to have back.

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3 Plymouth Fury

Making its debut in 1955, the Plymouth Fury was a sleek, powerful car. It was used by the New York PD for their cruisers, and it was all-American muscle car that was looking to set speed records for the time period. With a tough and scary exterior, this car also has another claim to fame in pop culture. In 1983, the King of Horror, a.k.a. Stephen King published a novel titled Christine about a possessed Plymouth Fury. The car bewitches a teenage boy after he purchases it and begins to suck the very life out of him. She has quite the jealous streak as well. It was adapted into a movie and further cemented this vehicle’s fame. Production was ceased in 1989 but this car deserves to prowl the streets once again.

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2 Pontiac Firebird

The Pontiac Firebird was unveiled on February 23, 1967, to combat Ford. It immediately earned its place among American-made sports cars with its sleek body design and powerful engine. This car is particularly well-known for its Trans-Am sports package. The Firebird remained a fierce competitor and gained even more popularity when it was featured in the movie Smokey and the Bandit where it displayed just what it was capable of in many car chases. Despite this, the Firebird’s production was ended in 2002. Like many of the cars from its time, the Pontiac Firebird sported a square, angular look that would stand out wonderfully amongst the cars of today if it were to make a comeback.

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1 Nash Airflyte

In this day and age, one thing that both consumers and manufacturers want in cars is fuel efficiency. A lot of things go into making a vehicle that gets good gas mileage but one of the key things is a design with maximum aerodynamics. With this in mind, the car that would be perfect to make a comeback is the Nash Airflyte. Introduced in 1949, the Airflyte was designed to be the most aerodynamic car of its time, undergoing a battery of wind tunnel tests to achieve amazing results. The car was discontinued only two years later in 1951 but with today’s focus on maximization, it's high time for the Nash Airflyte to fly again.

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