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Ferrari Reveals The Proper Way To Pronounce Purosangue

Ferrari released their 5-year plan yesterday, including a new SUV called the Purosangue--but how do you say it?

We have Motor1 to thank for getting all this juicy info on the upcoming Ferrari SUV, including its name: Purosangue. It means “thoroughbred” in Italian, which makes sense for a brand with a prancing horse on the logo.

Motor1 also has some Italians on their staff to get the proper pronunciation, which we confirmed with the soulless databases at Google to sound like this: pur-o-SAN-gway. The first syllable sounds like a combination of “pwur” and “pure” so can be hard to pronounce for the non-Italians in the room. “O” is just a long “oh” sound, while “San” is pronounced like the second half of NisSAN. Finally, “gway” is like Paraguay or Uruguay, or just a hard G with a “way” at the end.

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Other than its name, we don’t know a whole lot about the Purosangue. We know that it’ll be a front-mid engine design with the engine behind the front wheels and in front of the driver, while the transmission is at the back in order to make room for a potential hybrid powertrain. It’ll come in pure gas-burning models or hybrid models, making it not only Ferrari’s first crossover, but also their first hybrid crossover.

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However, don’t call it an SUV. Apparently, Ferrari CEO Louis Camilleri went on the record saying he hates the term during the Purosangue’s announcement. “That word, I do not want to hear it in the same phrase as Ferrari.”

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Yeesh. Hopefully “crossover” won’t set him off.

In terms of size, the Purosangue will be a little smaller than the Urus thanks to a lower roofline. The overall design is sort of like the crossover coupes you see with BMW and Mercedes. We may even think of just calling it a hatchback when the Purosangue is finally revealed, but we’ll stick with crossover for now.

Originally Camilleri was against the Purosangue, but he eventually came around when he was finally presented with a design that seemed Ferrari enough to build, and when someone pointed out just how ludicrously popular the chassis type was becoming in China. Dollar bills will change minds faster than anything in this world.

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We won’t see the Purosangue hit the roads until 2022, but hopefully we’ll get a few more details between now and then.

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