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  • 16 Spoilers That Literally Spoiled These Cars

    A spoiler is usually used to increase the grip of a car on the road. In the usual terms, the tires are forced on the pavement by the weight of the car, according to Physlink. If a person would like to increase the grip of a car without an additional spoiler, he or she should add to the weight of that vehicle. However, this wouldn't be the best idea because more weight won't help in turns, exactly where more grip is needed. The spoiler can be compared with an airplane wing, but the way it works is actually upside down; it generates “downforce” on the car’s body, and it's the most efficient way to achieve more grip.

    However, there's also a bad part of a spoiler mount. While the spoiler generates the so-called downforce, there's also a drag force generated (air’s resistance to motion). Too much drag isn't a good thing because the car can get slower. The main idea is that there shouldn't be too much downforce, and that's one reason why the F1 or Le Mans cars have a “lift/drag ratio,” enough force for the corners but not too much to make the cars drive slower.

    Besides the racing use, the spoilers also became a part of the exterior kits for normal street cars or for those who simply want a stunning — or an ugly — ride.

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  • 16 / 16
    The Wrong Direction
    via twitter.com

    The owner of this Hyundai has gotten it all wrong, starting from the Ferrari sticker, continuing with the fiery flames on the sides, and ending with the obvious wrongly mounted spoiler from the hood. What on Earth could have made him or her choose to fit it over there?

    Maybe the gearbox of this car didn't work in reverse, so they had to push it backward all the time and they needed a handle.

    However, it seems that the vehicle has another similar spoiler fitted where it should've been in the first place: in the back. They might've wanted some symmetry in this case.

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  • 15 / 16
    Beetle Whale
    via flickr.com

    Here's an obvious marine-animal lover. What one can see in this picture is the output of a Sea World fanatic who considered his or her car the best way to attract more clients. Transforming the tailgate of this Volkswagen Beetle into a gigantic whale tail was an act of exaggeration and maybe desperation. This vehicle no longer has its factory measurements; it became longer. Not to mention that it's not safe for the pedestrians that walk behind it. This spoiler is definitely wrong from the beginning until the end of this discussion. A whale could've simply been symbolized through a sticker or the simple word.

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  • 14 / 16
    Supercar In Spirit Only
    via e-pic.info

    According to The Drive, this Porsche 917 "replica" is one of the ugliest cars found on Craigslist. The edges and angles make it resemble an abstract art project, while the blade-style rims don't save it from falling apart when it is driven at high speeds. The “real” carbon-fiber spoiler is indeed one of a kind for this type of car because it doesn't fit in there at all. The whole vehicle is a kitsch made in the backyard of the owner’s house in a moment of true “creativity.” How about starting the project all over again? Maybe someone has more imagination to offer it a better image.

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  • 13 / 16
    Orange Fever
    via twitter.com

    This car looks like it was built in one night, in the garage, with a few friends while drinking some beer. One came with the spoilers, another one with the spray paint, but there should've been that one friend who knows a few things about cars and who should've used the saw well enough to cut the hood and place the awful air vent.

    For this car, one spoiler wasn't enough.

    The owner probably wanted two to be sure he definitely got some attention from his car. Welcome to the world of bad choices and ugly cars. It'll always be harder to create a stunning ride than an ugly piece.

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  • 12 / 16
    Big Yellow Distraction
    via barryboys.co.uk

    The yellow disaster. How could someone miss this one if it passed on the street one day? It's kind of a modern thing to buy the biggest, tallest spoiler you can find at the tuning shop and place it on a car. It's possible that those people believe their cars would go unnoticed without this type of spoiler, but they don't see the bigger picture. The car ends up being awful if “The Hugeness” doesn't fit, like in this picture. However, it should be mentioned that there are also situations when the huge spoiler fits perfectly on the vehicle and everything looks really nice.

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  • 11 / 16
    Double Trouble
    via youtube.com

    An interesting project, judging by some body parts and a few performance pieces that can be observed here and there, but it could've looked better without those two spoilers that ruin everything. This being a small car, one spoiler is quite enough actually if it's truly needed. Some hot hatches out there have more than 1,000 horsepower and no spoilers. How much power does this little one have? Was it made for drag racing or for “street art”? Or maybe just for the fun of it, and no one thought it would look awful like that. The owner may want to reconsider this work.

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  • 10 / 16
    Another Porsche Disaster
    via blogspot.com

    The owner of this Porsche wanted to impress the whole world with his creativity. He thought that no one had ever done this before and that he would be the first to see it this way.

    Taking three spoilers and combining them to make one is kind of a new idea but not in a good way.

    The first spoiler was chosen randomly just to fit on the car but not to fit with it. The second one was glued onto number one, so one cannot tell the difference between them. The third was then placed at the top to act as an umbrella for those who were eating or drinking on number two. It actually resembles a bar table.

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  • 9 / 16
    The Little Pontiac
    via thedrive.com

    According to The Drive, this little Pontiac was, in fact, a four-door sedan that was cut, sectioned, and then welded back as a two-seater. It was also on sale on Craigslist for only $1,500 because it needed some finishing work, but the word “some” may be relative. In fact, it needed a lot of work. The project idea was to cut the car into three parts, eliminating the middle one, and connecting the front and the rear. The remaining two doors are made out of half a front and half a rear door to fit. The structural integrity is quite shaky actually. However, the spoiler deserves some special attention because it seems to be homemade and one of a kind. In fact, it may be worth more than the car.

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  • 8 / 16
    Rolls Royce Ready To Race
    via sacwater.net

    The Rolls-Royce project Cullinan represented a test car for the all-wheel-drive platform of the company in 2015, according to The Verge. It was based on a shortened Phantom with a raised suspension. However, the strange thing about it and the one thing that makes it look quite ugly is the spoiler in the back that likely doesn't serve any role. Being a four-wheel-drive test car, why would it need a spoiler? It's a Rolls-Royce in the end, so what is that spoiler supposed to do over there? It kind of ruins the Rolls idea, actually, and it seems to be a villain's custom car from the movies.

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  • 7 / 16
    Scion Racing
    via honda-tech.com

    The vehicle in the picture is Chris Rado’s Scion TC racing car from 2009. It seems that the pilot figured out a way to gain better lap times by fitting a second spoiler in front of the car, along with the one in the back. He ended up with the ugliest racing car of that period, as most people mention on the forum of Honda-Tech.

    However, even if it was a better racing car, the appearance also matters most of the time when considering a car.

    It probably wouldn't have been able to win a beauty contest while looking like this. Not in a million years.

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  • 6 / 16
    BMW Reinvented
    via twitter.com

    This BMW is one of a kind with those huge wheels that surely touch the front and rear fenders at the smallest bump in the road and, of course, how can one forget, the gigantic spoiler that resembles a clothing stand. It makes zero sense. It doesn't help in case of a race, and besides, that car cannot race with those wheels, not in a million years. The spoiler should help the car stand on the ground at high speeds and also on corners, but this one cannot do that. One can be sure that the owner is very proud of his “masterpiece,” but in reality, the car is a total disaster.

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  • 5 / 16
    Huge-Winged Porsche
    via pelicanparts.com

    If it wasn’t for that huge spoiler, the car would've looked really nice with those pulled-out rear fenders, the matte-black paint, and the gigantic wheels. Unfortunately, the designer thought that this nice, little but very fast car would offer a nice view with its enormous spoiler in the back. It's ruined the image of that iconic Porsche; not to mention that it made the back of the car unusable. It's unthinkable that some designers can make such errors and not think of the consequences. People pay tons of money to get their cars modified, and many of them offer the tuning companies the possibility to modify their cars from scratch.

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  • 4 / 16
    The Ugliest BMW M4
    via bimmerboost.com

    The BMW M4 is one of the coolest sports cars on the market at an affordable price until someone comes and destroys its image with this thing in the picture. According to Bimmer Boost, the price tag for this glued-together vehicle was $82,999 in 2016, more than it was brand new. One may wonder if they were able to sell it eventually or if it ended up rotten in a parking lot. The project wasn't successful; the car is one ugly piece from the wheels to the gigantic horrible spoiler fitted back there, a desperate attempt to get someone’s attention at least.

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  • 3 / 16
    The Unstoppable Honda Civic
    via twitter.com

    This Honda Civic would be a normal or even interesting racing car if that spoiler would be removed completely. It seems that some people don't know the true purpose of a spoiler and have no clue how to use it, not to mention where it should be mounted.

    This one acts kind of like a wall while the car is on the move.

    Or maybe the person who fitted it wanted a bed during the lap brakes, taking into consideration that it's a really big spoiler. However, it definitely spoiled this car and ruined its chances to compete in a show.

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  • 2 / 16
    The BMW With A Cap
    via youtube.com

    The BMW from the picture seems to have been bought from the Transformers parking lot but was awfully modified afterward to fit perfectly between those ugly cars out there with hidden taillights, blackened windows, and that strange-looking spoiler that resembles a cap and that occupies half of the rear windshield. Why do these tuning accessories companies produce such ugly pieces? What can possibly make someone buy such a thing? The answer will still remain a mystery while more and more awful examples appear on the internet each day.

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  • 1 / 16
    A Double-Spoiled Honda
    via trinituner.com

    For a Fast and Furious-style car, this Honda looked awesome, but in real life, it actually needs a few adjustments. For example, the double spoiler that doesn't seem right over there. The one at the top of the tailgate would've been enough and would've matched the car, but the other one is an addition that should be cut off. It also seems to be a trunk model reshaped to fit over the taillights. Despite all of this, everyone knows that back then, everyone wanted a flashy and heavily tuned ride with all sorts of lights, stickers, and accessories.

    References: The Drive.com, TheVerge.com, BimmerBoostcom

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